Tag Archives: Lynde House care home

A feisty band and Chai Patel and Southern Cross

Two appearances -in-word by Chai Patel over the last few days – and both seem fairly innocuous at first reading. 

A piece from Community Care on Friday 29 July 2011 begins:

Operators taking over Southern Cross homes face a long battle to earn the trust of residents and relatives, ex-Priory Group boss Dr Chai Patel has admitted as he prepares to take over one-third of the homes.

Patel told Community Care the firm he will head up to run the homes faces a “long journey” as “reputations are breached in a second and take years to build up”.

He’s referring to the reputation of Southern Cross there.  Perhaps he should remember his own reputation and the way it was sullied by the experiences of residents of Lynde House care home.

An article in the Express on Sunday 31 July 2011 refers back to the year 2000/1 when residents of Lynde House  care home were neglected and mistreated, when Lynde House was owned by Westminster Healthcare, with ….. Chai Patel as its then Chief Executive.  Patel sold Westminster Healthcare soon after the scandal emerged.  Patel was apparently interviewed on Friday 29 July 2011 and  the former government adviser on elderly care, vowed that he would protect pensioners from the kind of ­maltreatment suffered at Lynde House, in Twickenham, Middlesex.

The Express quotes him as saying “The residents felt they could get recourse only by going public which has tarnished my reputation… I have never tolerated poor care and never would ­tolerate poor care.” 

You can’t get away with that one, Chai Patel – otherwise people may be hoodwinked or even deceived by such protest!

Did Patel never bother to read the Report of the Lynde House investigation, dated May 2002 and published on 2 August 2002 – 9 years ago almost to the day? 

If the Chief Executive shoulders no ultimate responsibility for the standards of care provided – or rather the sub-standard care a.k.a. neglect provided – the Chief Executive should not share excessively in the profits made either. 

Let’s look also at 1 October 2002, when the London Evening Standard printed a neat summary of Patel’s career path.  Including these words from Vince Cable talking about the feisty woman who had the courage to stand up to Chai Patel: 

“Without Gillian Ward and her brave group of relatives, none of this would have come to light,” says MP Vincent Cable. “They have done us a major public service. The climate of denial they faced was ferocious.”  “When I first raised the issue with Chai Patel, he totally poohpoohed it. All he had to do was to care enough to acknowledge their complaints, deal with them and apologise. But he chose to deny it and that led to it becoming a national public campaign.” 

I do hope that the residents and relatives of all current Southern Cross care homes don’t have to face the same kind of ferocious denial. I also hope that in his new role, Chai Patel will accept responsibility for the care provided in his name and under his banner.

Where does the buck stop?  If it doesn’t stop with the Chief Executive of a private care provider, then the buck will be in perpetual motion. 

And here’s Gillian Ward again – also known as Deddie Davies.  Still supporting those in care. 

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The long and uncaring road to justice for those neglected in care

The latest edition of Private Eye (No 1288) arrived this morning, and a quick read plus a couple of hours spent researching and reading further have proved most revealing. The home stretch (article heading!) may be somewhat encouraging, but then you discover that the wheels of justice have all but ground to a halt.  (Sorry, no link available to the article because it’s subscription only!)  But I hope the Eye won’t object to a brief quote:

“Nine years after formal complaints were first made about neglect and abuse of elderly residents of Lynde House, run at the time by Chai “Diddums” Patel’s Westminster “Care” Homes, the case against two nurses rumbles on – occasionally.

The adjourned disciplinary hearing is not due to resume until the end of July, with other dates listed in November and clearly no chance of reaching a conclusion until  next year.”

According to the Eye – allegedly!

Why has this case caught my attention?  Because I’m only 4 years along a similar road.

A little digging unearthed the Lynde House Independent Investigation Report from May 2002.  Plus a whole host of related information, through each year almost from 2002 to the present.

Jay Rayner from 2002 – A home unfit for heroes in the Guardian.

2005 report on Dr Chai Patel and the GMC disciplinary hearing Care home head denies misconduct – BBC

2008 Lexology allows everyone to see how long and winding is the road to justice, open to manipulation, in the best interests of ….. well, it doesn’t take long to work that one out, but it’s not in the best interests of care home residents who are at risk, their families or their supporters.

If anyone can tell me what has changed since 2002, I would be enormously grateful.

Why am I denied access to a Report produced by an Independent Consultant – commissioned by the Mental Health Care of Older People team but then snatched by the Local Authority as their own property –  into the neglect and subsequent death of my relative at risk in care?

Why is that report concealed behind the closed doors of the powerful but pathetic Local Authority?  The Lynde House Investigation Report bears such enormous similarities and is available in the public domain.

Why is a local authority able to provide such a barrier to justice, protecting itself and its Care provider in the UK?

Why is a Care provider in the UK able to provide such a barrier to justice?

Do they have more to hide than we know?

Am I likely to be required to spend a further 5 years of my life trying to achieve that thing we call justice?    If anyone reading this has any words of wisdom to offer me, I will be for ever in your debt and you will be for ever on my seasonal greetings list.

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