Patience a virtue?

Patience may well be a virtue but it may also tarnish your spirit.

This blog of mine has been silent for many months now, because I was patiently waiting and hoping that Care UK might just find it possible to be as virtuous as my patience has been since 2007.  Sadly, I now know that is not to be.  I waited and hoped in vain.  Foolishly, I gave the benefit of the doubt to Care UK.  Back in 2007 when I allowed my relative to be placed into one of its care homes, I placed my trust in Care UK.

From when my relative died, then through all the investigations and reports written by the Local Authority – with input from all and sundry –  and right through to the end of the hearings at the NMC in 2013, I continued to trust.  After the conclusion of those NMC hearings, with two nurses being struck off the NMC register, and two more having serious conditions imposed on their ability to continue working in this country as nurses, I asked Care UK to do the decent thing.  We entered into what began as meaningful and purposeful correspondence.

Since then, I have been passed around like the proverbial parcel.  Kicked about like a football.  I lost count of the number of times the goalposts were repositioned again and again. I’ve been bounced from Care UK to solicitors to financial bigheads to insurance policies, then back to bigheads and even bigger heads.

Care UK has shown itself to me to be a business stripped of humanity.

Fortunately, over the last year or so, I’ve been able to put my thoughts and feelings into another blog – far removed from this one, and not on Care UK’s radar, as this one has been.  But over the last few weeks and months, I’ve received so many kind comments about this particular blog, that I have decided to return to it and to resurrect it.

I’ll be back soon.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Patience a virtue?

  1. Hello there friend,
    May I suggest that you might find some allies on Eileen Chubb’s site? She has a twitter a/c and is also a co-founder of The Whistler with Gavin MacFadyen, the investigative journalist. As one of the BUPA7 who lost her job and her living for doing the right thing, she now investigates wrong doing, supports those who do the right thing and campaigns for legislation that will help to protect whistleblowers. BTW, I personally have no evidence to have great trust in any of our institutions – particularly medical research charities but then I’ve only been interested and investigating this area for 35 years.
    Please allow me to wish you well. Please accept my kind regards.
    Zara.

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